7 Tips on How to Help Build Your Child's Self Esteem ...

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In these days of overwhelming social media ideals and kids growing up at the speed of light, knowing how to help build your child's self esteem can be a challenge.

Even though it seems ‘kids these days’ are so different from when we were growing up, there are some parts of childhood that are still the same as ever.

Following are some tips on how to help build your child's self esteem that will stay with them for life.

1. There is No Such Things as Little Stuff

Whether it’s going to the fourteenth school concert of the school year to support your fourth-grader, celebrating the way your kiddo cut his waffle exactly on the grid lines, or applauding how she rhymed all of your pets’ names into one song, support that growing brain and learn how to help build your child's self esteem!

Little discoveries today will turn into bigger accomplishments later on in life.

When they realize that kudos for a job well done feel better than waking up to a snow day, they will want to continue to do better and better!

2. Even when They Don’t Make a Big Deal, You Should

It seems the rule of thumb these days is for children to try to be unimpressed…with everything.

This is just for show.

Deep down, kids love to know they are noticed and appreciated.

So when you get the note that your child has reached the final of the school spelling bee, or that she received a B in the class she struggled to get a C in last semester, throw a parade!

When he cleans his room without being asked, greet your industrious little one with two open arms, and a big “I’m so proud of you!”

3. Not Better than, but the Best You Can Be

Everything these days seems to be a competition.

Why not try to remind your child the only person she has to consider when trying to do better than last time is herself?

If they outdo their 3-point shooting average on the court, fantastic!

Who cares if it’s not the highest score in gym class?2

The momentum is moving in the right direction.

When your 9-year-old takes off his water wings, what’s the difference if he’s the last person in swim class to take the plunge?

In the end, the only person either of you will probably remember in that class is him.

Affection Affection Affection
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