7 Tips to Stop Bedwetting ...

Whether bedwetting is something new that has started to occur or if you are still struggling with helping your child to overcome it, here are some helpful tips. The following 7 tips to stop bedwetting cover a variety of options. Some might be just what you are looking for to help your child gain confidence and to eliminate some of the stress you both are feeling over the issue of bedwetting.

7. Offer Rewards

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Some bedwetting issues can be eliminated with a little hard work. In cases such as this, the reward system might be a good one to try. Kids tend to need an incentive every now and then. Give your child a reward of something he/she would look forward to. It’s best to not use food as a reward, since this has the potential to lead to problems later in life. Maybe your child has a favorite park or a movie he/she has wanted to see. Determine how many days of having a dry bed are needed to earn the reward and post this data on a sheet where you both can keep track of it.

6. Desmopressin or Imipramine

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These medications control the creation of urine during the night. With an empty bladder, there’s no chance of bedwetting. Not all bedwetting has to be remedied with medications, but in the instances where they are required, self-confidence is greatly boosted. Your child’s doctor can suggest the best medication for your child if it is necessary to stop the bedwetting episodes.

5. Training Pants

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Your child might not be completely ready for potty training yet. Girls and boys gain control of bladder muscles at different times in their lives. Most girls are successfully potty trained by the time they reach 18 months; some even a bit sooner than this. Little boys don’t have the muscle control necessary to keep their pants dry until closer to the age of 3 years. Training pants are a great option for naptime and bedtime when potty training is in progress.

4. Condition the Bladder by Delaying Urination during the Day

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This technique works from some children and is one of the suggestions offered by doctors. When your child has to go to the bathroom, have him/her delay the process for a couple of minutes. It might be best to practice this in the comfort of your own home so the bathroom will be in easy reach. If this doesn’t work, move on to something else to avoid either of you becoming frustrated.

3. Set an Alarm to Wake up and Use the Restroom

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Emptying the bladder part way through the night can stop the occurrence of bedwetting. Set the alarm for 2 or 3 hours after bedtime. You might have to physically carry your child to the bathroom, since kids tend to be difficult to wake once they’ve been sleeping for a while. Try gradually setting the alarm for a bit later if you feel 2 or 3 hours is too short of a time span before a bathroom break is actually necessary.

2. Make Sure a Bathroom Stop is Taken before Bedtime

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One last trip to the bathroom right before bed often works well with kids of most ages. It’s also a good idea to not provide any additional fluids a couple of hours before bedtime.

1. Rule out the Possibility of Medical Problems

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If you’ve tried a number of the above solutions at home and haven’t had good results, it might be time to visit your child’s doctor. You need to rule out the possibility of there being any underlying medical issues which need to be attended to. Whether there is a physical or psychological problem, the doctor should be able to tell you the best way to handle it.

Do you feel any of these 7 tips to stop bedwetting are going to be helpful to you or someone you know? Feel free to offer any additional suggestions you might have or techniques you’ve used in the past.

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